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out? do you smoke? what's your religion? do you want kids? now a hot question is: what's your credit score? and people, because they want to start out right and get a nice foundation, want to know. it's become obviously just easy to ask, especially during a tough economy. now people are more likely to ask this more freely. >>brian: here's the score. you should know if it's going to be a plus or minus for in a would-be relationship. here we go. is your credit score
the nones, n-o-n-e-s, because when they are shown a list of religions and denominations, and asked which one is theirs, they say, in effect, none of the above. last fall we did a well-received series on the nones, who they are, what they believe, and we want to revisit those stories today and in the next two weeks. our partner in theeriewas the pew forum on religion and public life, where greg smith is a senior researcher. >> almost one in five american adults, 20%, describe themselves as religiously unaffiliated. that equates to about 46 million adults in the united states, so this is a big, growing, important group in american society. to see its continued growth at this kind of rapid rate has been very striking. >> striking indeed. in the early 1990s just under 10% were unaffiliated. since then that number has doubled. about 13 million are atheists and agnostics. 33 million more describe their religion as "nothing in particular." by education and income and other common measurements, the nones are very much like americans as a whole. except for age. >> about one-third of all american adul
discussed on the show, the free exercise of religion includes religion and non-religion. so this country is fundamentally secular. we shouldn't bring in one specific, not even just christianity, but one specific version of christianity that would not teach what the catholics or the hindus or the muslims or the atheists believe in the public schools and teach it instead of established science. >> do you ever wake up in the morning and say, "hey, i'm only 19. i've got rice, tough school to get out of and get started in my life, in my work. why am i doing this?" >> i don't think it's a choice. i think it's something that has to be done. and i'm the one who's in the right position to do it, so i'm going to do it. >> well, zack, i've enjoyed this conversation, and i wish you well. thank you for coming. >> thank you so much for having me on. >> zack kopplin is just the latest in a long line of dissenters and freethinkers. since america's beginning, every generation has had to engage in the battle over freedom of religion and freedom from religion -- whether it's roger williams fighting puritan
religion - it's to give us the skills so if you are interested in going on further, that you'll be able to pursue it, so that's the key there. before taking a couple more questions, we are actually kind of waving good-bye to our first dimension as we move down the pike. but good-bye's not the same - we want to keep these dimensions together. we're going to - i'm kind of excited - we're going to move into myth in particular, but myth and ritual, and in this class, i want to talk about the relationship of myth, ritual, and include religious experience, so we're going to be doing that also. but before launching into this great leap into the next segment of the course, i just want to take a few more questions on buddhism, or comments or insights that you had. yeah? >> when i think of christianity or judaism, i think of community, families - the thing with hinduism and buddhism are the men seem isolated from the women, and the men are social people; it seems - i want the family to be brought into it, i guess because of my christian background, i see worship as a family unit. and maybe i'm no
form of religion in this country are christians, so you can say anything you want, i suppose, and get away with it. but not really so, a christian nation, because the first amendment to the u.s. constitution separates church and state. however, i always like to say, "well, in some senses, it's a christian nation, but it most certainly is a jewish nation, because that whole creation, liberation, exodus, making of a holy land - we've got towns around here called zion or new canaan or whatever - what the whole drama - and again, i'm not making this up, folks, as dave barry would say - the ministers on the boats, like the arabella , coming into the plymouth colonies, actually gave sermons that replicate or bring out the whole old testament drama, so we get a feel of these kinds of things there. let me move - before we take a couple of questions here - i want to get to our rabbi bronstein, because what makes this class work is you don't have to listen to some religious studies professor talk about somebody else's religion; you can listen to the real thing. and in this case, we have rabbi b
in texas. 900 people with four churches, one blinking stoplight and no movie theaters. so religion was what people did. everyone went to church. and my father was far more conservative than the average person in the town. we were not permitted the to wear pants, shorts, no alcohol, no dancing, no musical instruments in our church of christ. so in lots of ways i was quite at home in saudi arabia. [laughter] i devoted my time to trying to figure this country out precisely because i think it is the one arab country that is truly strategic not only because it is the world's largest exporter of oil which sustains the western way of life, but because saudi arabia, i am convinced, will be critical in the ultimate resolution of what is the proper islam which is going on now between the radical jihadists, if you will, and the more modernizing muslims. and that very battle also goes on inside saudi arabia. to try to understand the society, i knew that it's like someone coming here to write a book about america. you wouldn't be able to go to washington and and claim to understand america. so i had to
for churches, one blinking stoplight and no movie theaters. religion is what people did. everyone went to church and my father cahan was more conservative than the average person in the town. we were not permitted to wear pants, shorts, no alcohol, no dancing, no musical instruments in our church of christ. so is not some of ways i was quiet home in saudi arabia. i devoted my time to try to figure this country out because it is the one arab country street -- and truly strategic not because it is only the largest exporter of oil that sustains for western rail of life, but because i'm convinced will be critical with the ultimate resolution of islam that is going on between radical jihad is and more modernizing and that goes on inside saudi arabia. to understand the society it is like someone coming here to write a book about america you could not go to washington or new york and claimed to understand america so i had to be confident i could get outside of riyadh, there washington, and i was permitted over the five years, i went all over the country and i saw all kinds of people, the roya
't true. he went on to write books. and after that, he invented the religion, it's called scientology. well, what is scientology exactly? there's a lot to know about it. it's a very different world view created by a writer who had the specialty of science fiction. and so there are many elements in scientology that sound like science fiction. they were written by somebody who had written similar things in much of his fiction. in scientology, the idea is that you are an immortal soul. in scientology that is called -- you have lived before and you'll live again. what scientology can help you do is remember the past lifetime and achieve your salvation. it's good news to a lot of people. and in the course of therapy that scientology has is called auditing. the auditor, between you and your auditor, there's a device, it's called an emitter. two cans, you hold two cans. in the old day it is used to be campbell soup cans with the label scraped off. there's a wire connecting it to a meter and a small amount of electricity passing through the wire. it's one-third of the lie detector. it doesn't
. they think religion will dominate the powers of the state rather than democratic values? >> yes. i think for many reasons. first is the historical reasons is that when you look at what is happening in the middle east to reduce islamic world so to speak. i speak about most leave countries to the arab world. if you look at the arab no will democracies over there. so we think it has to do with religion. i has nothing to do with religions first because the arab world is not islam. the great majority of the muslims are not arabs. that's why this has to do with democracy. the second thing is the perception that islams alien to all the values and islam has no take on all these principles. that's why they should say rule of law equals citizenship, universal coverage, accountability. these principles are not against islamic frame of reference. >> rose: but are they principles where there are islamic majorities in government that they, those islamic majorities want to either create or to put in the process. >> i think it's what we saw whatever was, whatever were the reasons of the uprisings in w
women wrote on facebook i was told because of her religion her royalty is to the muslim religion. she is not republican. dylan is not muslim. >> you will have a few crazy people. our party is no different. >> reporter: party leaders denounce the comment as racist and hateful. >> as i said we will go by our bylaws. she has her chance and opportunity to oblige. >> i can't believe this is what we have been spending our time wasting around doing. in the meantime the democrats in the capitol. >> reporter: she refused to answer a reporter's question. there was no sign of her in the delegation just before the votes were tallied and declared a winner. dhillon becomes the first woman to be republican vice chair in california. party leaders say the win shows the gop is changing. >>> it has been nearly five decades since an attack in alabama. the unexpected apology they got this weekend. >>> i don't know the right answer right now but i'm going to do something. it just has to happen. if i sit and wait nothing is going to happen. >> he is young and ready to make a change. we will show you how a b
parents like that. very modern. very open-minded. unlike for some, there's no question of religion, of color of skin, or anything like that. people can be all beautiful. it depends on who they are, but it is not a question of color. for me, both of us were beautiful. and i loved color. color of the skin. tattoo on the skin, which is a kind of color. some blue colors that you add. and i wanted to show that. when i started, i remember that there were some beautiful girls. they're beautiful. but i felt like, ok, but there is also beauty. i have a girlfriend which was modeling for me that i met very early when i started that was from a french colony. she was beautiful and black and very inspiring, very nice. i say, yes, why not. for me, a difference was beautiful. they looked to me, and i wanted to show it. another kind of different was the fact that when i saw farida, i said, my god, she is incredible. i was very impressed by her beauty. very frightened even by her beauty. she was kind of a very arrogant imperial. and african and beauty with a special expression. not arrogant. but bea
the death penalty? shouldn't we -- because without the death penalty we would snriet religion. [ laughter ] -- we would not have a religion. >> no. [cheers and applause] >> steve: thank you so much for joining us, mr. bloodsworth. kirk bloodsworth,
leaders of the nation of islam. congressman ellison responded by saying i was attacking his religion which is not true. i never discussed his religion. i was pointing out that his constituents, american people deserve to know whether he spent a lot of time with going around with farrakhan and khalid abdul mohammad. you may not be familiar with him but i thought i would my for you what this vile human being has said about people in the past, jewish people. he is a sitting member of congress, sharing the stage with this guy? watch this. >> sean: here is reaction is the chief strategist for the tea party and radio host, david web, what was your reaction when you find out that apparently there is even a spokesperson for louis farrakhan and was associated with him and mohammad sharing the stage. what does that say about ellison? >> what it says he chooses the people he agrees with. let's call it what it is. what our parents taught us, who you associate with is who you are. he doesn't need them for political power but he chooses to associate with them. he also plays another game now he is saying
it clear while we don't have jurisdiction over religion in the same way we don't over sexual orientation, what we're seeing in all of these -- and all of these are case by case, you can't just broad sweep the laws -- when students are bullied and harassed in this world because of religion, in most instances a lot of that is not about race or religion, it's because. perception that students that share certain religious traits also share certain ethnicities and that is discrimination and that falls under title 6. it is not just about enforcing the laws that make it clear how the laws apply. it is, though, as we said, you can't get at this through enforcement alone. this is a culture that tolerates this and in too many ways promotes it. as tom mentioned we have an unprecedented partnership not just between our agencies but agencies across the federal government that the president has convened to bring our best resources and minds to bear to do something about it. there is now a web site, where a tool kit is being developed and these kinds of best practices are being promo
of comparing everything and saying everything's religion, but what we're trying to say is that some of the most fundamental kinds of things that people do in terms of behavior get enlarged in the religious context. sure. >> i wanted to take the idea of the eucharist and say that we find that in the incas, with their ritual of presenting a heart from a living creature. all around the world, long before judaism or christianity came into being, this same idea of, the symbolism. >> yes, the beating heart. and of course, you may know, if you know a little history, that the early christians were accused of being cannibals. they would go in and they'd be eating flesh and drinking blood, and in their cultic stage, that was a real problem. >> there was a comment made some years ago, and probably many years ago at this point, but one of the problems that seem to be rising out of the change in the catholic mass, the roman mass, from the latin mass to the english mass, or at least as it's celebrated in the united states, was the loss of the mystery and the symbolism that was inherent in latin, and that was
as our religion is a road to god just as buddhism is a road to god and the more important thing is that we all get used to finding god in this world. >> stephen: how is baseball anything like -- god does not take nine innings. >> but god, like baseball, is timeless. >> stephen: baseball feels timeless. [laughter] >> see now, the key that i'm trying to get at in this book is the fact that -- what we as human beings should be doing is searching for meaning. frequently meaning is that which we can learn and put in a mind, especially a wonderful mind like yours. [laughter] but frequently the real meaning of life can't be put in cognitive terms. there's a word i use in my course and in the book it can't be reduced to words. we experience it. the way we know we're in love, for example. the way we know life as meaning. >> stephen: i like that inhe havable thing because i can say something is true and go, i can't schain it, i'm right though -- i can't explain it. i'm right though. [cheers and applause] and many -- [cheers and applause] >> stephen: i'm ineff able about everything. >> i k
and did remarkable things while they're. speaking of religion and faith, when we first met and international treat some years ago we were talking about exactly this. how do you not burnout? she said public health is my religion. so whatever works for you, work it. >> hello. from kentucky -- [talking over each other] >> no way! [talking over each other] >> i am -- [inaudible] -- i am finishing and i also felt inspired by appellation, they want to pursue public health, health disparities. it plagues our homes and i just wanted to ask, in a lot of gendered classes we talk about what is the best way to address gender inequalities? is it top down? do you start with government? is the grassroots? do you want to know where it is? >> it is both. it is both. >> thank you for that question, thank you for sharing that. >> i am elizabeth barnett, i was fortunate this summer to travel to india, we were there for two weeks and was struck the full time by the amount of garbage in india. and so my question is how do we get anyone to care about their health when the first thing they need to
religion that a growing number of people have no trouble with god, no trouble with faith but they have a lot probables with religion and with the church. fur us as catholics, that's a tough one because we always see jesus and his church as one. so to restore that sense of luster and reform and purity to the church to attract more people, that's another one we hear about. you hear again about want new evangelization. how are we going to win back those nations especially in europe that are nominally catholic but have drifted from catholic fervor. you hear about the growing churches in asia and latin america and africa where there's more people than they know what to do with, where there's massive material needs. they need more such of churches. they need more schools and hospitals. they need more priests and sisters and qualified lay leaders. you hear all about the joys. you hear all about the sorrows. it's a magnificent symphony in the life of the church they find very embracing very uplifting. >> schieffer: well, there is also your eminence, things like the cover-up of sexual crimes, p
me back to obama and first campaign, guns and religion. >> i thought you were going to say.... >> bob: people cling that their religion when they are in bad economic times like this. i think you find people looking for spiritual guidance. that is why churches are getting more people and i think it's a good thing. >> did you admit we are in bad economic times. >> bob: relatively. >> eric: so sunday night, big night, i believe it was 8:00 eastern and 9:00 another production, celebrity apprentice and walking dead was on. i was completely trifurcated. >> bob: were you drunk? >> eric: picking between the three. is this the series that gets played every single year at holiday time, ben hur. >> bob: anybody else have a view. >> the book is usually better than the movie. it's a good reminder to revisit the story that helped shape your faith. i have a children's bible. i loved it and pictures in it. >> bob: what about you. >> andrea: they marketed it very well, but the point of this, we heard right and left that christianity is dead from newsweek. we heard them elevate christians as freaks and
religion, but particularly islam, there's not always a clear understanding to what the first amendment guarantees, which is the right to teach about a religion but not proselytize about it. i think there's fear of associating with anyone associated with islam. there are events outside our control that creates more interest and unfortunately also makes people more afraid. one of the programs we are about to launch is putting all our content online so a teacher in north dakota where there are no muslim, potentially, no expert can come to her classroom, they can go to our web site and download the content and teach the things we are teaching. >> i think partnerships are the best way to overcome the limitations because we all have limitations. and sometimes it's just visibility. we actually have on our web site 50 short films and one of them is a muslim student from a school in fremont going to a school in arinda talking about what it's like going to school as a muslim in the united states and they are asking questions and you see we are all kids in school and we have more similaritie
together all of those blessings of all of the religions, of all societies, all the love that exists in this universe, to bring us together." and we know this is the way that we feel, commander. and in our prayers, people say that it is time to forgive. and you taught us, you taught us about that infinite love that you need to have in order to forgive during the most trying of times. no leader in the history of our country has been so maligned, so vilified, and so violent attack than our own commander, our president, never in 200 years have so many lies been told about a man, not neither here nor anywhere else in the world. even boulevard, who was of course betrayed, but they never dared to vilify him during his time and even after his time. but they could not do it. the allies and the hatred could not do it, because here he is -- allies and the hatred could not do it, because here he is, our commander. why couldn't they do it? you know why, dear and a steam-- esteemed heads of state who have brought your pure love and shown that to this man beyond ideologies and political frontiers,
: because of her religion her loyalty is to the muslim religion. she is not republican. dhillon is not muslim but rather sikh. >> you're going to have a few crazy people and biggots and our party is no different. >> i can't believe this is what we've been spending our time wasting around doing. in the meantime we have a 2/3 super majority of the democrats in the state capital. >> reporter: she refused to answer a reporter's question. there was no sign of isenburn just before the votes were tallied. and dhillon declared the winner.dhillon now becomes the first republican chair of california. in sacramento, david munick ktvu news. >>> new information tonight about a rash of robberies in the peninsula and the public area where is many of these crimes are taking place. >>> a major breakthrough today as researchers announce had the a baby born with hiv has been cured. >>> and is protection against identity theft really scare away the thieves? in a ktvu special report we'll take a closer look at the effectiveness of one such company. you're on timeout leo! ♪ ♪ some things won't l
religion so she will defend muslim beheading two men without any hesitation, she's a sikh immigrated to the us frus india when she was a child. >> if you have sensitive feelings you shouldn't be involved in politics and i've been involved 25 years. so i've gotten over the sensitivity. >> the post has been deleted and says comments were out of context. >> 115 catholic cardinals will gager to choose a day for selecting the next pope. they were summon asked once together will decide the start of the conclave when the next pope will be chosen. meantime, pope 16th took his first full day in retirement. some say he showed signs of exhaustion. >> you only had to look to see how sick he looks. how weak, and -- he's deteriorated. the pope's twitter are account has been cleansed, all tweets wiped for the next pope. >> well, coming up, why this weekend may be the perfect time to take a walk in a park. that has nothing to do with the accu-weather forecast. >> also and a young boy meets the blood don qlorz helped keep him alive. >> latest salmonela recall could end up why your child's easter bask
women's group on facebook. she wrote that dillon's loyalty is to the muslim religion and she will fund it without hesitation. she is not a republican. dillon is actually sikh and imigrated from india when she was a child. >> if you have sensitive feelings you shouldn't be involved in politics in the first place. i have been involved for 25 years. i have gotten over the sensitivity. >> the facebook post has since been deleted. she says her comments were taken out of context. >>> a teen -- teenager's voicemail meeting triggered a lock down near pittsburgh, pennsylvania. it features the teen inning aer wrapping the lyrics from "the fresh prince of bel-air." the secretary thought it said shooting people outside the schools. the lyrics are shooting b-ball which is a reference to basketball. they releasted the teenager -- released the teenager, no harm, no foul. >>> the band, train, is taking a stand. they said they will not headline the 2013 boy scouts national jamboree until the organization reverses its ban on gays. train made the petition urging its members to denounce the ban on gay peo
are all created equal, applies to everybody regardless of sexual orientation, as well religion, or ethnicity. the justices will hear the case later this month. new at 11. lawyers for the aurora, colorado theater shooting suspect-- have indicated their client might plead 'not guilty' by reason of insanity. in court documents made public today, attorneys for james holmes want the judge laws. unconstitutional. multiple counts of murder and attempted murder in the july 20th shooting spree. 70 others were wounded. in the nation. a three- and a half cent- this summer. the state board of equalization voted to hike point- five cents per gallon. that tax is levied on gasoline suppliers, but it's often passed on to consumers. coupled with federal and other state taxes, california drivers may be paying more than 70 cents in taxes for every gallon. here is a look at average prices around the bay area right now. in san francisco-- $4-25. in oakland-- $4-17. and in san jose $4-19--a gallon. the weather was beautiful today -- but that's expected to change over the weekend. >> jacqueline: we c
and everyday we know that the epidemic of violent vls knows no raise carried or religion but we also know that there are absolutely objective risk forks that we can pass on and that is the hope and action of wrap around we work to reduce those risk factors associated with violent injury and community partners and by doing so we give young people the opportunity to live if become heros and by reducing the injury resid diskism these case manager that is i have to have on stage with me because they are so much everything to me ... (applause) they work they work everyday to make my night job observe sleet and i would love to see that day. i want to first thank these case managers and haive judiciary and ruben and michael you are the heros full of home, determination and inspiration i'm so proud of what you have done and i thank you for absolutely being my brothers in this cause. i couldn't say enough (applause) . >> to our compliant rep.s our cline in the back of the room, joe drakely please stand up and let us give you a hand. thank you for trusting us in your journey to a rich life and
backgrounds, cultures, races, religions and sexual orientations and additional, recruits and maintains faculty and staff from the same broad range of backgrounds. to achieve these goals town provides scholarships to approximately 20% of the students and act i don't havely solicits a diverse student body. so here is a little bit about the short-term lease terms. we're looking as a mentioned before a term of july through -- pardon me august of this year through july of 2013. they do have the option to extend through september of 2014, with the department consent. and to show you how serious we are that this is a short-term lease the department and town have agreed to a $10,000 per day penalty for any day they would be in the space beyond their lease expiration date. and again, they are permitted to use the space for the operation of their k-8 school and they will also be maintaining and keeping open to the public the bathrooms in the lobby area that have been open to the public through the use of the exploratorium. we have negotiated a monthly rent of $42,000 a month, which is comparable to wha
. when she had problems or needs, she sought help from the gods of her hindu religion. until one day he heard a new voice telling her to go to church. >> when i was born, the astrologer told my father it is not worth raising me as his daughter. he said it is better if you end her life now as a baby. it kind of poisoned his mind and thoughts towards me. >> reporter: rada was raised in a devout hindu family in india. she had a strained relationship with her father, one that worsened over time. >> every business failure he endured or financial loss, he blamed it on me. he became an alcoholic. and he abused us physically and verbally. >> reporter: she sought comfort and acceptance in her family's faith. >> every time i went to hindu temples and worshipped god, but when i came out of the temples, there was always a void. and that void was so strong. hopelessness was always there. >> reporter: rada turned to education in her search for purpose. she excelled in her studies. >> i did my masters in medical and psychiatric work. after i completed that, i was given a job to work as a counsellor in
francis of assisi. here and across italy, religion is called into the architecture. the community that has been growing for centuries is in decline. they're lacking a generation of young priests and monks and to fill the pulpits. the young are no longer answering the call. the church in italy is aging. only in the developing world is the catholic faith growing. father joseph is in training to the franciscan friar. he is one of only 14 left in this vast seminary. and he is from zambia. >> in africa, the catholic church is growing in numbers. >> what is your impression of the state of the church in europe? but the numbers are going down -- >> the numbers are going down. in europe is getting out of touch. >> that new reality of a church increasingly anchor in the developing world is not reflected in the vatican hierarchy. two-thirds of the cardinals gathered here to choose the next pope are from europe or north america. and out there in the parishes, where the pastoral work goes on, the world around them is changing fast. geobotany is a parish priest in the suburbs of rome. he is an energetic
. in death, he is quickly becoming a religion. >> the cult of hugo chavez, which has rallied the venezuelan people over the last couple of days. they will now have a longer period in which to have him lie in state. it's also a political tool for the government because there is such a lot of sympathy for the government -- for chavez at the moment. what better clinical platform to run on than chavez himself lying in state across the country? >> what struck you most about the mood in venezuela? interesting.y he went down to the line. i stood there for a while -- you went down to the line. i stood there for a while. people have been standing out in the heat. it got -- it did not feel like a funeral dirge. it felt like a celebration. a wanted this to be a celebration of hugo chavez's life -- they wanted this to be a celebration of hugo chavez's life. when you speak to people, the tears well up. the atmosphere amongst the crowd was happy. there was music. there were people selling ice cream. there were people selling toys. it is all about chavez, but also a celebration of national pride. >> what
really was a larger than life president. in death he is quickly becoming a religion. >> the cult of hugo chavez which has rallied the venezuelan people over the last couple of days. they will now have a longer period in which to have him lie in state. it's also a political tool for the government because there is such a lot of sympathy for the government -- for chavez at the moment. what better clinical platform to run on than chavez himself lying in state across the country? >> what struck you most about the mood in venezuela? >> it's really interesting. he went down to the line. i stood there for a while -- you went down tho the line. i stood there for a while. people have been standing out in the heat. it got -- it did not feel like a funeral dirge. it felt like a celebration. a wanted this to be a celebration of hugo chavez's life -- they wanted this to be a celebration of hugo chavez's life. when you speak to people, they tears well up. the atmosphere amongst the crowd was happy. there was music. there were people selling ice cream. there were people selling toys. it is all about ch
obama sostuvo encuentros con lideres de diversas religiones. y como nos dice lourdes en washington hoy obama pidiÓ que oren. >>> se uniÓ a lideres de la iglesia catÓlica, mormona y judÍa que se reunieron con el presidente obama por dos horas. dicen que les pidiÓ oraciones para que la reforma se haga una realidad y discutieron una estrategia polÍtica. >>> el primero que nada pidiÓ orasp oraciones. >>> el mandatario les dijo que espera q el senado apruebe su proyecto en junio. >>> esperamos ver algo antes del verano. >>> y que debe ofrecer ciudadanÍa 11 millones de indocumentados. >>> que nuestro paÍs debe tomar una posiciÓn moral, si es moral necesitan el sistema polÍtico, el sistema polÍtico necesita que la iglesia entre en el dialogo. >>> la cuaresma presenta una oportunidad. >>> aprovechar este tipo de pascua, de celebraciÓn cristiana para empujar a los conservadoras que todavÍa no estÁn convencidos. >>> el presidente se reuniÓ brasil el tema de la reforma con activistas. >>> el presidente pidiÓ el Énfasis de perseguir a empleadores que los explotan, la reuniÓn com
, but anger is now spilling from the big urban centers to smaller towns and villages. religions are accused of neglecting the party. >> my mode has been knocking on the door for a job since he graduated with a business diploma 14 years ago. he tried to set himself on fire in front of the local government building two months ago. staff turned him away suggesting he shined shoes or work at a charity. >> when you stay for three days without food, why would you want to live anymore? even stray dogs find food on the streets while i've start. i do
a strange relationship with religion, we are spiritual but none of us like organized religion. we have a strange relationship with the truth, too, your truth and my truth, but we don't like to suggest that my truth has anything to do with your truth. we keep to ourselves and be tolerant of one another. in a world where that could cause problems because if there is no connection between your truth and my truth, there is no common ground we can come together. i think pope benedict will be remembered for proposing a way of addressing the realities of human life that allow forces the recognition of truth that we can agree upon. that can build the basis for how we shape our lives together. >> heather: speaking of moving forward, what is the most important characteristic needed in the next pope. will they look at age as a factor? >> reporter: there will be a lot of factors that are considered by the cardinals. most important thing is that the pope is first and foremost a witness, he is an apostle, an heir to st. peter. his job is to christian witness in the world and to bring the message of
culture from top to bottom, from the economy and technology up to the religion. the problem is that what we find in the field as data is primarily information on technology, on the material culture. you find buildings and pot shards and stone tools and things like that. so how do you move from that data to the organization of society and then to their religion and these other aspects of culture ? and there is only one way to do that. and that is to go to living populations, living cultures that are being studied by ethnographers, by our colleagues in cultural anthropology, and use them as analogies. keach: in the 1970s, anthropologists documented a society called the kawelka in the highlan of papua new guinea. the kawelka society numbers about 1,000. they could be either a tribe or a chiefdom, because the population limits defining social types are not fixed. here in the highlands, people raise sweet potatoes and pigs. like the first residents of copan, no one here has acquired great individual wealth. but men like ongka can acquire great prestige and influence. such leaders are called "
religion her loyalty is to the muslim religion so she will defend the muslim without hesitation. she is not republican. party leaders denounce the comments as racist, hateful, and dhillon quickly brushed them off as well. >> you're going to have a few crazy people and bigots. and our party is no different. >> they say it is deciding whether to punish the member who made that offensive remark. >>> a hollywood great was in a south bay tonight at the cine gls quest film festival. harrison ford was there and we had an one-on-one interview with that famous actor. now in san jose with the details. it must have been a thrill to talk to indiana jones himself. >> he was. indiana jones and hans solo, my favorite growing up as a kid. it was neat for all of us who got to meet him. harrison ford told us he's been asked to come to cinequest for years now and finally gave him a reason to do so. he is honored by the award to just be a part of the film festival. >> i'm very honored to be here to receive this award. i appreciate it. >> reporter: harrison ford now joins a list of celebrated factors who
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